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20121202
20121210
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the fields of engineering, science, and math -- you dig, the numbers are fairly is stunning. -- fairly stunning. roughly 44% of graduates are in those skills. europe is at 24%. i say this respectfully, and i know we are on c-span. when the your pants -- the europeans are outpacing us, in these key fields that will drive innovation, then you know we are in trouble. i would correct one comment. there have been at some of us, chris coons and marco rubio, we have put forward legislation long before the election that said, let's look at this talent competition issue. let's put forward an approach that many of us, those of us that have been from the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science and engineering or math graduates, native-born americans, particularly focusing on losing the numbers in middle school where girls and children of college had enormous challenges, that is something we will have to come back to. we also have to continue to attract talent from around the world. one of the ways tha
is my wonderful co-authored it is a professor to of political science and political philosophy and art. many years ago when we were both at princeton university week co-taught a course on ethics and public policy, and that led to as co-operate several books on deliberation and democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, you give it to legislate examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you would, walk us through those. >> so this is a tale of two compromises. and it begins with ronald reagan presidency where tax reform was a huge and important issue and a hugely difficult issue to get done between the republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era recognizes that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch little too liberal democrat and reagan's staunch conservative republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise. part of the movers of that compromise. test for to the affordable care act. it ven more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party, because of the permanent campaign and helped not just pol
of our own problem getting our own students excited in science and engineering. if we could cut the atransition rate of students in science and engineering, we could meet many of our need in the united states for stem workers. so i think it's important that we have the trust if we address the high skilled immigration issue, we don't do that as a substitute for looking at all these other issue that is still need work. your question ends up being do i trust that congress will do something and track vord not too good. >> one thing i want to say in response to senator warner who i agree with almost all the time which he said the election was a size mick shift. i think it's important that both sides don't overplay their hand. i understand the democratic side of president obama winning reelection and by a pretty significant electoral margin. it also was clear if you looked at the data that the reason for that predominantly was the latino vote. indeed one statistic if mitt romney had gotten the same percentage of latino vote george w. bush got he probably would have won. you have to ge
of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment. and these individuals and organization form the ideas that frame the debate that goes on both in the legal arena and in the political arena over t
. >> economics, science of explaining where all the money went. the field of economics is divided into two main categories , microeconomics with examines why stephanie was here a minute ago and macro, with such a the economy as a whole to determine have that much money can this be done . analyzed it to study wine making money to replace the money the disappeared is not going to work. the best course of action is to reject the idea that the money is really down and carry on like nothing happened. other theories argued the only way to fix this is-the people at the most money to share with everyone else. except that money is never coming back and everybody pantages to use to it. >> bill clinton. let's do it. >> bill clinton, 42nd president of the united states his popular appeal nearly provoked house republicans to impeach him for conduct in his personal life, an unprecedented move that would have made a mockery of the u.s. constitution and was therefore quickly dismissed as a level with the time. a self-described new democrat he sets his policies would have been only the second president to face
with science definitively established with what you may think -- for me when it comes to the age of the earth there is a concept a i believe god created the heavens and earth. i think the scientific advances have allowed us to have given us insight into when he did and how did you but i still believe god did. that's the i been able to reconcile that. other people have a keeper -- i think in america we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe. that means teaching them size. they have to know the science but also parents have the right to have theology and reconcile that. as they believe in secret. i think that's the point the president was making. back in 2007 when he was asked that question. that's what i was saying. >> we will accept it in the context. >> our faith, my faith says god created the universe. he created the beginning out of nothing. god created the heaven and the earth's. scientists have decided we needed and how he did it. the more sides learned, the more i'm convinced that god created it. [inaudible] >> later returned to the catholic church. spin
, whether it is education or science, without finding ways to control the growth of entitlement spending more than the affordable care act? >> we have quite a democratic shift happening. it is happening for the next 25 years. many people would like to live forever, but are not going to, even though we are going to try. we have 10,000 seniors every day coming into medicare. we have to contain the rate of growth and costs. we have to understand those are saying is we are promising to take care of. can we make sure the health delivery system is more efficient? yes, we can. i have talked about some of my proposals to do that. we should demand more accountability on that. we should have beneficiaries and patients participate not by denying them care and benefits, but by being healthier. taking the recommendations, following innovations and not doing too much doctor shopping. eating right and exercising. you could also have lousy teams. it is not like you are in control of all of this -- you could also have lousy genes. we are going to have a responsibility of a lot of seniors coming on line a
choosing your capitalist. there was one of those typical, business and social science. one of those typical varieties of capitalism's. they have a nicer capitalism in the street. we have a more rampant cowboy capitalist. and a very myopic kind of discussion because it failed to see the extent to which european capitalism has become so americanized. you know, the european union is more open, if anything, to much of what we have been discussing in terms of free capital flows and deregulation than any other. so it has been in myopic discussion. but i think everyone now does recognize this is the capitol system. and hopefully people will get beyond looking for a better variety of capitalism and use the kind of democratizing language your speaking of to try to get to somewhere else. get to a better society that is not structured in terms of capitalist social relations and the drive to capital. >> do things. [inaudible] agreed to help and to privatize so that they stand aside. create our own. [indiscernible] >> yes. i think a central theme of the book is, to some extent, the type of reforms. for
including the institute of medicine of the national academy of sciences that has looked at this and there is no connection. host: north carolina. republican line. you are on, sir. caller: this is gary. are there flu shots you could take that do not have egg? i am allergic. host: -- host: dr. frieden? guest: most reactions to eggs are not actual the other's reactions. and this to develop hives or have trouble breathing, you should not worry. host: democrats line. laura. caller: i'm a 49-year-old african american. back in the day my parents used to give me this thing called father john. they made sure they gave us our vaccination, however i have learned that bad stuff builds up in -- that stuff buildup in the immune system. i also take cod liver oil. my daughter thinks that is the worst stuff, but she has never had the flu. i think sometimes we forget there were things we did not have in the past, and the things that people were taking to keep people alive, and just with the air we breathed now, it is dangerous. people could reflect on some of the things that old people ta
impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit, you showed what persistence to make sure your area was treated fairly. even though i must tell you many of us were not a joyful to hear your requests but never the less the outcome was great. you have set an example. our country has to be prepared to protect its supporters whether it is from the military or other kinds of encouragement or as the establishment of a program that says if you build and live here, that your route should not be taken away from you without the government helping to restore things. one of the questions i thought about when i heard you had this assignment is how much you had to do with this. it may take a long time to solve the problem. we commend you for your work. ad
california's stem cell agency has done a lot for science but more needs to be done and it can be improved. >>> tara will have the last check of your morning commute, including foggy conditions. there they are. you can't even see the sunol grade but it's there somewhere. 8:52. when we come back, "mornings on 2." 3çíño% >>> welcome back. 8:54. new details about a story we first told you about at 4:30. oakland police say eight people were arrested after the s.w.a.t. team served search warrants near 79th and macarthur overnight. they've been detained for various offenses, including illegal possessions of firearms. reportedly, a rifle and handgun were also seized. >>> we have an update on this. we told but this, an oakland hills car fire. well, the fire is out. crews are still out there on campus drive near merit college. that plume of smoke filled the air. the first call came in about 8:00 this morning. the fire department tells us no injuries have been all righted. >>> california's stem cell agency is being cite sized for how its grant money is being handed out. a newly released report fo
. and high-tech cars it used to be the thing of science fiction or high-end luxury cars but now, changes with gabe slate tech report. from ford. >> this new technology that we are seeing is amazing. it typically, these high-tech features are only in really expensive luxury sedans. costs over $60,000 but that is all changing. ford is building and some really cool new high-tech features into their affordable cars. and trucks. >> this is the new technology being implemented and 24 vehicles. the keys are a thing of the past. this will work with eight key fob derange. also, the-key fog is in the range, which also with the handsfree killed eight, if it is also in range, the hands free to locat tailgate itl activate the liftgate to opened and it will up to the same to shot in the liftgate. this front panel also will control your gps, and other functions it is like a tablet with a touch screen that offers easier and safer and also will double as a rear camera. it is a great way to avoid accidents, red, yellow, green and guides tha wind blowing up. helping. and also, that will help you guide you
in an edition of popular science that there was an experimental program called the invisible i and it was a program that was a precursor to the contact lenses. so he got on the train, went into new york and got enrolled in the program and got his set of invisible eyes. so he went to the recruiting station and watched how they did the examination. he watched the navy and the navy had one line. he would go down the line and get your physical exam. he would get your psychological exam and then your eye exam. then he watched the coast guard and the coast guard had two lines. the first one was for your physical exam and then your psychological exam and then if you pass that they told you to get into the other line for your eye exam. so he figured that would give him just enough time to slip the contact lenses into his eyes, which he did. the recruiter said, read the bottom line. he said, how far down? he said as far read retro so the sailor read. he said what you're reading? he said i'm reading the bottom line. he said, you are reading patent sentence so you clearly have the eyes of
proposition. last week i saw one of their science programs. they introduced something called crowd sourcing. it is individuals with their own computers take down complex intellectual problems and solve them and then up load the answers to help scientists. last week they saw these unbelievably complicated issues about protein. i like to bring crowd sourcing into this policy. maybe we can set them up in every state assistance could learn what is going on and there's a budget and then come up to the great hill there and see if we could take on a crowd sourcing of the federal budget. at least we're getting an education if we're paying attention. you can not be simple enough. we need the basics. what is the base as and broaden the base? them we would have an independent check on the work of the ceo and all the bookings. guest: thank you. that is a very interesting idea. the go to the federal budget, they have tax cuts or you can plug in which taxes the want to get rid of and how it affects the rate and individuals and their tax burdens. they also have one on the spending side. it is a terrific t
a bikini and all this became illegal. in the classroom in math and science and literature, these are the early days in 1980. our subject were replaced by government propaganda. i had grown up reading jane austen and ernest hemingway and now, i had to face propaganda eight hours per day. i was 14-years old. what you think, honestly, having something become illegal? what you think the average teenager -- how political can 14-year-old get? you ban fun and the 14-year-old becomes political. that was the basis of all the protests that began in iran after 1980. sharia law came into place in iran early after the revolution and then democracy and freedom of the citizen is impossible. the same laws that govern iran in 1979 and 1980 are still in place. there have been some cosmetic changes here and there depending on what administration you have. things got a little bit better but there were things you get away with like male college. does that really make a big difference? -- even get away with things like nail polish. does that really make a difference? no, the same set of laws w
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)